Avox in Arcadia (perpetual) wrote,
Avox in Arcadia
perpetual

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The Kairos 30-Day Meme: Seven Favorite Artists

This is a queued entry and does not reflect my current status. A new post will appear each day this month, but to preserve novelty, the categories that I used won’t be listed publicly beforehand. If you’d like to use my template, let me know and I’ll privately send you the complete list of categories so that you can rearrange and swap them out to suit yourself.

If you don’t want to bother with the entire meme but still want to play, it is highly encouraged to list some of your own favorites for today’s category in the comments.


Day Seven: Visual Artists


I'm slightly embarrassed to say I don't really know much about art. Collecting seven of them kept turning into a dilemma of "I can't put pop art on the same list as a Great Master! I need more pop artists! Or more Great Masters!" More variety in media also would have helped. But, given my own limits, I had to scrape together what I had and put them on one list. To salve my conscience I arranged them by relative age and authority instead of personal favoritism. Here's my end result.


Fiona Staples



Even the best comic artists usually have some kind of subject matter they can’t draw quite as well, or a number of pages that look a bit slapdash from time to time. Except Fiona Staples. She doesn’t have a weak point. (According to her, it’s spaceships, but I have yet to find evidence.)



As a failed artist myself, I never run out of respect for illustrators who can handle every aspect of visual art from the vanishing point to the anatomy of facial expressions -- panel after panel, page after page. Don’t talk to me about “high” and “low” art. Comic books are goldmines.




Melody Peña



I collect Windstone sculptures, by which I mean I have one and want more. You know how the tiniest things you encounter in your childhood can end up being formative to your creative development? One of mine was a Windstone catalog. I pored over it again and again. I was picky about my mythical critters, but I couldn’t find a single thing I would change about these.



Looked up the company once I was immersed in online fantasy art fandom years later, and periodically after that. There are so many more molds now, and the classics are still there, shimmery and dramatic and warmhearted.




Banksy



Street art is glorious; I’m not going to fuss about the difference between street art and graffiti (because it reminds me of the alleged difference between graphic novels and comics, which isn’t), but a little bit of skill, imagination, and overall artistry goes a long way to set Banksy apart from your basic vandal.



With anyone else I would ignore the story behind the artist, since I believe the work should speak for itself, but with him/her/them, the secret identity and the guerilla tactics are really part of the work. Read up on the history a little and see if you don’t smile.




Hayao Miyazaki



I know I’ve already used him once (categories overlap; you’ll see a lot more of this), but I tried to keep his artistic skill out of the spotlight when talking about his genius as a director. Now I just want you to look at a few of these sweeping lines and vivid colors and imagine what it must be like to create populated worlds using only simple tools and your own two hands.



Movement is part of the medium and particular evidence of the research and hard work that supports the inspiration fueling animated stories. Making it look this natural is a gift. Thank you, Miyazaki.




Salvador Dali



Bet you have a favorite Dali, even if you’ve never much thought about it. Maybe you’re a fan of melting clocks? Maybe you remember appreciating, however briefly, that the swans really do reflect elephants, even if they are ugly.



I was at a coffeeshop with some older teenagers who weren’t paying attention to me, once, and there was a postcard-sized print of “The Temptation of St. Anthony” under the glass on the table. I slipped it out and stared at it. And stared, and stared. It made me feel disturbed and morbid and I loved it. I still do.





Vincent Van Gogh



Is Van Gogh the Robert Frost of painters? God, I love universally renowned dead guys. A five year old could fall in love with “Starry Night.” A world-class art critic could (and probably has) spend a lifetime analyzing it. To admire beauty is to understand it, and that shared knowledge brings us all together as one people.



When you take the time to really look at some of Van Gogh’s paintings (in a gallery, if you’re lucky), you may think about the poor lost man who created them and feel a twinge deep in your heart. Don’t mistake it for sorrow. It’s love.




Peter Paul Rubens



One of the first college courses I took was Art History, which mostly serves the purpose of showing you how much you don’t know about art history. One assignment was to choose an artist to present to the class; I tried for Dali and Van Gogh, but she wanted us to stick to the great masters. I thought about who we had studied so far and picked Rubens because his art had the most horses.



I can’t remember too much of what I researched, but I can tell you that research can change “Honestly who even cares about the great masters” into “Look at the composition, the light and shadow!”...and that sometimes the horses have wings.


Tags: 30 day meme, a comic i read, an anime i watched, comic scans of doom, links, saga
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